ESPN Names Jeff Stallings as Vice President, Fan Engagement

Consumer MarketingCorporate AnnouncementsFan EngagementSales & Marketing

ESPN Names Jeff Stallings as Vice President, Fan Engagement

Jeff Stallings has joined ESPN as Vice President of Fan Engagement. In this role, he is responsible for growing the ESPN brand and building upon ESPN’s relationship with fans. He will work closely with all senior leaders in the company including distribution, content, communications, programming, sales and marketing to grow the fan base and develop deeper fan relationships across the ESPN platform. He will be based in the company’s New York office reporting to Wanda Young, Senior Vice President of Marketing and Consumer Engagement.

Said Young, “Jeff is a data-driven marketing executive with a proven history of direct-to-consumer experience in multiple industries who will expand ESPN’s ability to engage today’s sports fan. He is passionate about ESPN’s opportunity to further advance the marketing intelligence required to drive our business.”

Stallings joins ESPN from Walmart, where he served as Senior Director of Media. Throughout his tenure, he led a team who delivered strategic media planning and buying for Walmart US across all digital and traditional platforms, helping create an in-house programmatic capability and establishing critical strategic partnerships across a portfolio of media companies.

Prior to Walmart, Stallings was the NA Consumer & Small Business Director of Media for Dell Inc. where he was instrumental in developing integrated and performance based CRM strategies to acquire, retain and engage customers to achieve growth. His previous roles included management positions in agency media planning and buying. Jeff received a BA in Advertising from the University of Oklahoma.

Amy Phillips

My responsibilities in the communications group are largely of the Corporate Communications variety. A Midwesterner at heart and a St. Louis Cardinals fan, I am grateful every day to call New York City home. An alumnus of the College of the Holy Cross, I hold out irrational hope that one day the school will recoup some of its former mid-century sports prowess.
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